Amazon Watch
June 2011

Dear Mark,

“I want to remind you that our fight in Ecuador is for life and for justice,”
Secoya indigenous leader Humberto Piaguaje told Chevron management and shareholders on behalf of 30,000 Ecuadorians whose Amazon home has been destroyed by the company. Along with Amazon Watch and dozens of other courageous activists and allies, he journeyed thousands of miles to the company’s annual meeting to demand that Chevron be held accountable for all of its destruction, from the Amazon to Richmond, CA.

Humberto’s words resonate with me as I think about our campaigns and our work in the last month. They are for life and justice, for corporate accountability, indigenous rights and for the future of the Amazon and our global climate. While we recently celebrated momentous victories across campaigns for corporate accountability in our work around a string of annual shareholder meetings, we’ll have to use this new vigor to keep up such pressure and to ramp up the fight in Brazil, where the government has just green-lighted an installation license for the Belo Monte Dam. The struggle continues and it needs your support!

For life, for justice.

Leila Salazar-Lopez

Leila Salazar-Lopez
Program Director


From the Frontlines: Thank You from Ecuador

From the Frontlines:
Thank You from Ecuador

A heartfelt video message straight from the frontlines of the Ecuadorian Amazon. You watched only two weeks ago as Servio Curipoma, a cacao farmer from the oil-ravaged town of San Carlos stood face-to-face with Chevron senior management at the company’s annual shareholders meeting. Through tears, he told his story: “My mother died from your cancer. You killed my mother.” Back in his homeland, Servio sends gratitude for the kindness, generosity and support that the people of the US and the world have shown to communities of the Ecuadorian Amazon.

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Last Stand for the Xingu!

Last Stand for the Xingu!

Last week we received tragic news that the Brazilian government issued Belo Monte’s installation license, in its continuing assault on human rights and the environment in the Amazon. It’s now more important than ever to take a last stand for the Xingu and its peoples. “This is the last chance we have to paralyze Belo Monte’s construction,” Renata Pinheiro, leader with the MXVPS, told the indigenous assembly last month. “You succeeded in stopping Belo Monte for 30 years. Now more than ever we need to strengthen our resolve, joining forces to stop the beginning of construction.”

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Ivanhoe Energy Commences Covert Drilling Activities in the Ecuadorian Amazon

Ivanhoe Energy’s Covert Drilling Activities in the Ecuadorian Amazon

In brazen disregard for both Ecuadorian and international law, Canadian company Ivanhoe Energy has started secret oil exploration activities on legally-titled land of the Kichwa indigenous people of Rucullacta without the community’s permission. But while Ecuador dawdles, the Rucullacta community has drawn a sharp line in the sand (or forest); with successful efforts already to kick out company workers, the community may just stop this disaster before it starts.

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Amazon Watch and RAN Demand Justice from High Above the Bay

Amazon Watch and RAN Demand Justice from High Above the Bay

Bold activists from Amazon Watch and Rainforest Action Network rappelled from the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge in the San Francisco Bay Area to hang a 50-foot banner demanding justice for Chevron’s crimes in the Ecuadorian Amazon. The banner, which read “Chevron Guilty: Clean Up the Amazon”, brought attention to the recent Ecuadorian court ruling that found Chevron guilty of its contamination and liable for up to $18 billion.

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ConocoPhillips Withdraws from Oil Block 39

ConocoPhillips Withdraws
from Oil Block 39

After years of engaging with and pressuring ConocoPhillips, its CEO James Mulva announced at its Annual General Meeting of shareholders that the company has withdrawn from its controversial co-venture with Repsol-YPF in Oil Block 39 of the remote northern Peruvian Amazon. Oil drilling in Block 39 and neighboring Block 67 has come under fire from human rights groups due to the presence of indigenous peoples living in voluntary isolation in this region, and the risk of forced displacement and deadly epidemics.

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