Has Australia become a US State or Japanese colony?

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One wonders if there is a government in Australia. From recent news reports of what the Japanese whalers are doing in Australian waters there appears to be total lack of any substantial government response to stop the slaughter and theft of Australian natural resources.

Why are Japanese whalers permitted to poach in Australian waters?

How can a US Court issue orders to Sea Shepherd to stop its operations against the Japanese poachers in Australian waters when the ships and the branch of the society involved are registered in Australia?

Japan orders Australian flagged Sea Shepherd ships to leave Australian waters!

Yoshimasa Hayashi, Japan’s fisheries minister, has stated: “So why don’t we at least agree to disagree? We have this culture, and you don’t have that culture.” Okay this sounds fine. Now all those against the bloody slaughter of whales and dolphins on Taiji Island will descend on the island and stop the slaughter because it is their culture. Hayashi it works both ways my friend!

What is sickening is the Australian government’s inaction. It would appear that they are in connivance with the whalers to loot the natural resources of Australia.

And while the US Court issues its orders, the Australian government remains castrated.

What a shame that all self respecting Australians have no say in the matter.

BTW: Japanese whalers are slaughtering whales in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. I think they are confused about the meaning of the word “sanctuary”!

Live Encounters Magazine March 2013

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http://liveencounters.net/?p=2711

Live Encounters Magazine March 2013 http://liveencounters.net/?p=2711 features –

01.   Candess M Campbell Phd. – Guest Editorial

02.   Father Ivo Coelho from the Ratisbonne Monastery, Jerusalem, has written an exclusive article for Live Encounters titled – The Person, Human and Divine, in India – Richard De Smet’s contribution

03.   Chris Hedges, American Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and writer – The Myth of Human Progress.

04.   Marc Wiese, Documentary film maker of CAMP 14 Total Control Zone (about a North Korean who escaped from one of the concentration camps) in an exclusive Skype interview with Mark Ulyseas.

05.   Irish Poet, Playwright and Writer, Terry McDonagh pens a heart breaking poem – Limbo.

06.   Natalie Irene Wood from Galilee says it – Jews Should Ignore Holocaust Memorial Day.

07.   From student activist to law maker, Rainer Tormin chats with Mark Ulyseas about the breathtaking era of the late 60s early 70s in West Germany when students “made” the change.

08.   A young Bengali photographer, Sourav Jourdar exhibits his photographs of Bengal.

09.   Human Rights Watch report on Canada’s Highway of Tears… a must read!

10.   Randhir Khare’s Harvesting Silver is about the traditional fishermen in Indian and their fight for survival.

Please share this edition with all your family and friends.

Om Shanti Shanti Shanti Om

Mark Ulyseas
Publisher/Editor

Human Rights Watch – Mexico – Crisis of Enforced Disappearances

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Mexico

Peña Nieto Needs Strategy to Investigate, End ‘Disappearances’

(Mexico City) – Mexico’s security forces have participated in widespread enforced disappearances, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Virtually none of the victims have been found or those responsible brought to justice, exacerbating the suffering of families of the disappeared, Human Rights Watch found.

The 176-page report, “Mexico’s Disappeared: The Enduring Cost of a Crisis Ignored,”documents nearly 250 “disappearances” during the administration of former President Felipe Calderón, from December 2006 to December 2012. In 149 of those cases, Human Rights Watch found compelling evidence of enforced disappearances, involving the participation of state agents.

“President Peña Nieto has inherited one of worst crises of disappearances in the history of Latin America,” said José Miguel Vivanco, Americas director at Human Rights Watch. “While his administration has announced some important measures to assist victims, it has yet to take the steps necessary to ensure that those responsible for these horrific crimes are brought to justice.”

Human Rights Watch found evidence that members of all branches of the security forces carried out enforced disappearances: the Army, the Navy, and the federal and local police. In some cases, such as a series of more than 20 enforced disappearances by Navy personnel in June and July 2011 in Nuevo León and Tamaulipas, the common modus operandi of the crimes, the scale of the operations, and the inconsistent accounts by the Navy suggest the crimes may have been planned and coordinated.

In over 60 cases, Human Rights Watch found evidence that state agents collaborated directly with organized crime groups to “disappear” people and extort payments from their families. For example, evidence indicates that local police in Pesquería, Nuevo León arbitrarily detained 19 construction workers in May 2011 and handed them over to an organized crime group. The men have not been seen since.

The nearly 250 disappearances documented in the report do not represent all of the cases in Mexico since 2007. On the contrary, official statistics leave little doubt that there are thousands more. A provisional list compiled by the Federal Prosecutor’s Office and the Interior Ministry of more than 25,000 people who were “disappeared” or reported missing since 2006 was leaked to the media in November 2012.  

Prosecutors and law enforcement officials consistently fail to search thoroughly and promptly for people reported missing or to investigate those responsible for the disappearances. All too often, these officials blame the victims and tell families it is their responsibility to investigate, Human Rights Watch found. What limited steps prosecutors take are undermined by recurring delays, errors, and omissions.

In none of the 249 cases documented by Human Rights Watch have the people responsible been convicted for carrying out disappearances.   

The inept or altogether absent investigations exacerbate the suffering of the families, for whom not knowing what happened to their loved ones is a source of perpetual anguish. Making matters worse, families of the disappeared may lose access to basic social services that are tied to the victim’s employment, forcing them to fight slow, costly, and emotionally draining battles to restore essential benefits such as child care.

Luz María Durán Mota – whose 17-year-old son, Israel Arenas Durán, was disappeared together with three coworkers in Monterrey, Nuevo León after being detained by local police in June 2011 – told Human Rights Watch, “It is a daily torture, not knowing where he is. If they are torturing him. If he has eaten anything.”

Efforts by the Calderón administration to address this problem were belated and grossly inadequate. For most of his presidency, Calderón denied that security forces had committed human rights violations. In his last year he acknowledged that abuses had occurred and pledged to take steps to address them. But he did not fulfill most of his commitments, such as completing a national registry of the disappeared, or submitting a new legislative proposal to Congress to reform the Code of Military Justice that complied with four rulings on the issue by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

The report also documents examples of positive steps at the state level to address disappearances. In Nuevo León, government officials and prosecutors, responding to pressure from victims’ families and human rights defenders, have begun to investigate seriously a select group of approximately 50 disappearance cases. While progress so far has been limited, and only a few disappeared people have been found, the collaborative effort shows how winning back the trust of victims’ families and empowering them to hold prosecutors accountable can help overcome some of the greatest obstacles to investigations.

Ultimately, the success of state-level efforts will depend in large measure on whether the federal government takes steps to address the problem. To this end, Human Rights Watch urged the Mexican government to:

  • Establish comprehensive, accurate national databases of the disappeared and of unidentified human remains;
  • Reform the Military Code of Justice to ensure that all alleged human rights violations, including enforced disappearances, committed by military personnel against civilians are investigated and prosecuted in the civilian justice system;
  • Revise the definition of enforced disappearance in federal and state laws to ensure that it is consistent across Mexico and in line with international human rights law; and
  • Issue an executive order mandating the immediate presentation of all detainees before the public prosecutor’s office and making clear that under no circumstances may detainees be taken to military installations, police stations, or illegal detention facilities.

An enforced disappearance is a “continuous” crime under international law: it persists, and continues to inflict suffering on the victim’s family, as long as the fate of the missing person is unknown or concealed.

“While disappearances may have started on Calderón’s watch, they did not end with his term,” Vivanco said. “Thousands of the disappeared are still missing. Soldiers and police are hiding the truth about their fate. And the victims’ families continue to suffer from not knowing what happened to their loved ones.”

Examples of disappearances featured in the report in which evidence strongly suggests the involvement of security forces:

  • Ten men from Guanajuato were illegally detained in December 2011 by local police in the municipality of Joaquín Amaro, Zacatecas as they returned from a hunting trip. According to two members of the group who escaped, police officers blindfolded, beat, and interrogated the men about whether they had ties to organized crime. Security camera footage shows local police later handed eight of the detainees to armed men at a gas station in Fresnillo, Zacatecas. The eight men were never seen again.
  • José Fortino Martínez Martínez was arbitrarily detained at his home in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas in June 2011 by men wearing Navy uniforms, as members of his family looked on. Relatives of Martínez and other men abducted that night took photographs and video footage of the vehicles that participated in the detentions, which bear Navy insignia. In July, Martínez’s wife met with federal prosecutors and representatives of the Ministry of the Interior to request investigations into her husband’s disappearance. Three days later, her home was sprayed with bullets.
  • Roberto Iván Hernández García and Yudith Yesenia Rueda García, both age 17, were abducted from the home of Rueda’s grandmother in Monterrey, Nuevo León, on March 11, 2011, by men wearing federal police uniforms. Several family members witnessed their illegal detention. Approximately a week later, a man came to Hernández’s home and warned a relative that if the family wanted to avoid more children being taken, they should not report the case to authorities. Hernández and Rueda have not been seen since.
  • Oscar Germán Herrera Rocha, Ezequiel Castro Torrecillas, Sergio Arredondo Sicairos, and Octavio del Billar Piña all called their spouses separately to tell them they had been stopped by local police at a gas station in Francisco I. Madero, Coahuila in May 2009. They were never seen again. Three people disappeared in identical circumstances in the same location the previous month.

List of Terrorist Organisations Proscribed by the British Home Office

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Invisible Palestinians  PROSCRIPTION CRITERIA

Under the Terrorism Act 2000, the Home Secretary may proscribe an organisation if they believe it is concerned in terrorism. For the purposes of the Act, this means that it:

commits or participates in acts of terrorism;
prepares for terrorism;
promotes or encourages terrorism (including the unlawful glorification of terrorism);
or is otherwise concerned in terrorism.

If the statutory test is met, there are other factors which the Secretary of State will take into account when deciding whether or not to exercise their discretion to proscribe. These criteria are:

the nature and scale of an organisation’s activities;
the specific threat that it poses to the UK;
the specific threat that it poses to British nationals overseas;
the extent of the organisation’s presence in the UK; and
the need to support other members of the international community in the global fight against terrorism.

Proscription makes it a criminal offence to:

belong to or invite support for a proscribed organisation.
arrange a meeting in support of a proscribed organisation.
wear clothing or carry articles in public which arouse reasonable suspicion that an individual is a member or supporter of the proscribed organisation.

The penalties for proscription offences can be a maximum of 10 years in prison and/or a £5,000

The information about the groups’ aims was given to Parliament when they were proscribed.

Abu Nidal Organisation (ANO)
Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG)
Al-Gama’at al-Islamiya (GI)
Al Ghurabaa
Al Ittihad Al Islamia (AIAI)
Al Qa’ida (AQ)
Inspired and led by Usama Bin Laden, its aims are the expulsion of Western forces from Saudi Arabia, the destruction of Israel and the end of Western influence in the Muslim world.
Al Shabaab
Ansar Al Islam (AI)
Ansar Al Sunna (AS)
Ansarul Muslimina Fi Biladis Sudan (Vanguard for the protection of Muslims in Black Africa) (Ansaru)
The aim of the GIA is to create an Islamic state in Algeria using all necessary means, including violence.
Asbat Al-Ansar (‘League of Partisans’ or ‘Band of Helpers’)
Babbar Khalsa (BK)
Basque Homeland and Liberty (Euskadi ta Askatasuna) (ETA)
Baluchistan Liberation Army (BLA)
BLA are comprised of tribal groups based in the Baluchistan area of Eastern Pakistan, which aims to establish an independent nation encompassing the Baluch dominated areas of Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran.
Egyptian Islamic Jihad (EIJ)
Groupe Islamique Combattant Marocain (GICM)
Hamas Izz al-Din al-Qassem Brigades
Harakat-Ul-Jihad-Ul-Islami (HUJI)
Harakat-Ul-Jihad-Ul-Islami (Bangladesh) (HUJI-B)
Harakat-Ul-Mujahideen/Alami (HuM/A) and Jundallah.
Harakat Mujahideen (HM)
Hizballah Military Wing
Hezb-E Islami Gulbuddin (HIG)
Indian Mujahideen (IM)
IM aims to establish an Islamic state and implement Sharia law in India using violent means.
International Sikh Youth Federation (ISYF)
ISYF is an organisation committed to the creation of an independent state of Khalistan for Sikhs within India.
Islamic Army of Aden (IAA)
Islamic Jihad Union (IJU)
Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU)
Jaish e Mohammed (JeM)
Jammat-ul Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB)
Jeemah Islamiyah (JI)
Khuddam Ul-Islam (Kul) and splinter group Jamaat Ul-Furquan (JuF)
Kongra Gele Kurdistan (PKK)
Lashkar e Tayyaba (LT)
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG)
Palestinian Islamic Jihad – Shaqaqi (PIJ)
Revolutionary Peoples’ Liberation Party – Front (Devrimci Halk Kurtulus Partisi – Cephesi) (DHKP-C)
Salafist Group for Call and Combat (Groupe Salafiste pour la Predication et le Combat) (GSPC)
Saved Sect or Saviour Sect
Sipah-E Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) (Aka Millat-E Islami Pakistan (MIP) – SSP was renamed MIP in April 2003 but is still referred to as SSP) and splinter group Lashkar-E Jhangvi (LeJ)
The aim of both SSP and LeJ is to transform Pakistan by violent means into a Sunni state under the total control of Sharia law. Another objective is to have all Shia declared Kafirs and to participate in the destruction of other religions, notably Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism.
Tehrik Nefaz-e Shari’at Muhammadi (TNSM)
Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan (TTP)
Teyre Azadiye Kurdistan (TAK)
TAK is a Kurdish terrorist group currently operating in Turkey.
(Note: Mujaheddin e Khalq (MeK) was removed from the list of proscribed organisations in June 2008, as a result of judgements of the Proscribed Organisations Appeals Commission and the Court of Appeal).

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LIST OF PROSCRIBED NORTHERN IRISH GROUPS

Continuity Army Council
Cumann na mBan
Fianna na hEireann
Irish National Liberation Army
Irish People’s Liberation Organisation
Irish Republican Army
Loyalist Volunteer Force
Orange Volunteers
Red Hand Commando
Red Hand Defenders
Saor Eire
Ulster Defence Association
Ulster Freedom Fighters
Ulster Volunteer Force
Home Office
23 November 2012
 
And now Britain has its very own homegrown movements….born and fed in Britain.
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The recent expose by a British publication on the life  and hate speeches of Anjem Choudary is a clear indication that “loving hands at Home” have permitted this for reasons best known to the puerile politicians.
 

All the best Prime Minister David Cameron on your trip to India!

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The umbilical cord between Britain and India can never be broken..and thank goodness:)

Here are some highlights of his speech in Mumbai:

–          “We have the biggest visa operations anywhere else in the world right here in India. I announce that we are going to introduce for businesses a same-day visa service to those who want to come to our country and invest…,” Cameron told India Inc at Hotel Taj, the country’s hospitality icon.

–          On the issue of Indian students in Britain, he said there is “no limit” on the number of Indian students who can study in universities there and also no cap on the length of time they can stay and work in graduate-level jobs after they qualified.

–          Cameron, who is accompanied by the largest-ever trade delegation, also said India should continue to reduce trade barriers to create better opportunities for British companies.

–          “Britain is looking to take down the (trade) barriers …we want the Indian government to continue to open up trade barriers and make it easier to do business here…We have to make sure that just as we welcome Indian investments into Britain, it is easier for British companies like banking, retail etc. to invest in this vibrant and fast growing economy,” he said.

–          The British premier also said there are great opportunities for Indian companies to invest in Britain.

–          “When I see Indian investment into Britain  I only see hope…investment like Jaguar and Land Rover, which is a massive international success story…We welcome that sort of investments,” Cameron said, adding his country seeks to be the most investor-friendly market.

–          “The time to forge partnership is now as the British economy has started to recover from difficulties of last two years and the Indian economy powers ahead (to become) one of the great powers,” he said.

Yes Prime Minister Indians must begin to invest more in Britain:)

All the best for your trip!

Kali Yuga Strike One – Meteorites hit Russia

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News just in: A meteorite strike in Russia’s Ural Mountains. Loud explosions were heard. Apparently more than 900 people have been injured…mainly from flying glass. Damage was reported from six towns.

LINK

This is what I love about the Universe. It often reminds us of how small and insignificant we really are in the vastness of Space!

BTW: A newly discovered asteroid about half the size of a football field will pass nearer to Earth than any other known object of its size tonight, giving scientists a rare opportunity for close-up observations without launching a probe. LINK

Dear Anat Hoffman we support the Women of the Wall!

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Anat Hoffman, Rabbis Jeremy Gordon & Moshe Freedman debate Women of the Wall and who owns Judaism. 

Arrest of Anat Hoffman at the Wall. She was strip searched and made to sleep on the floor of a prison cell for the night!

Anat and the Women of the Wall ….we are with you…don’t give up…you are the true face of Israel!

xxx

On Valentine’s Day, February 14, 2013, one billion women will dance, dance to highlight the atrocities committed against them, sing for equality, and celebrate freedom of Self.  Let us begin to be the change.

LINK

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